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  • The Polychaetes Scratchpad site is dedicated to information (images, videos, publications, specimens, etc.) of marine bristle worms (Polychaeta). The site has started to be populated with content very recently and information is gradually being added. The classification used in this site does NOT reflect current taxonomic knowledge. It is currently being used for browsing content only, but will be cleaned up in the future. Developed by: The database is maintained by the Institute of Marine Biology, Biotechnology and Aquaculture of the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (HCMR). It is supported by the Greek LifeWatch infrastructure. Scratchpads was developed by the Virtual Biodiversity Research and Access Network for Taxonomy (ViBRANT), a EU FP7 project. Technology or platform: The site is based on a virtual research environment called Scratchpads, which in turn is based on the content management software Drupal.

  • The objective of RAMS is to compile and manage an authoritative taxonomic list of species occurring in the Antarctic marine environment, for establishing a standard reference for marine biodiversity research, conservation and sustainable management. The taxonomic scope of RAMS covers Antarctic species from the three realms of the Southern Ocean: the sea floor (meio-, macro- and megazoobenthos; micro- and macrophytobenthos), the water column (phytoplankton, zooplankton, nekton) and the sea-ice. Developed by: The RAMS website and databases are developed and hosted by the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ). The RAMS content is managed by an Editorial Board comprising an Executive Committee and associate Taxonomic Editors. The RAMS Executive Committee plays an advising role in the development of RAMS and proposes Taxonomic Editors. It links with the SCAR-MarBIN International Steering Committee. To allow RAMS to be as exhaustive as possible, the role of the network of Taxonomic Editors is crucial. These Taxonomic Editors are world experts on the taxonomy of their relevant taxa and are in charge of the content and quality control of data for their specific group. Used data resources: A series of preliminary species lists of Antarctic marine invertebrates, mostly for macrobenthic groups, were compiled by Andrew Clarke and Nadine Johnston of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), with funding from the UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office and British Antarctic Survey. These lists have been or are being checked and updated by taxonomic experts.

  • The aim of WoRMS is to provide an authoritative and comprehensive list of names of marine organisms, including information on synonymy. While highest priority goes to valid names, other names in use are included so that this register can serve as a guide to interpret taxonomic literature. The content of WoRMS is controlled by taxonomic experts, which are technically supported by the Database Management Team. Aphia, the consolidated database behind WoRMS, contains valid species names, synonyms and vernacular names, and extra information such as literature and biogeographic data. Besides species names, Aphia also contains the higher classification in which each scientific name is linked to its parent taxon. The classification used is a ‘compromise’ between established systems and recent changes. Its aim is to aid data management, rather than suggest any taxonomic or phylogenetic opinion on species relationships.

  • The Catalogue of Life is the most comprehensive and authoritative global index of species currently available. It consists of a single integrated species checklist and taxonomic hierarchy. The Catalogue holds essential information on the names, relationships and distributions of over 1.5 million species. This figure continues to rise as information is compiled from diverse sources around the world. There are two distinct versions of the Catalogue: the Catalogue of Life monthly edition and the Catalogue of Life Annual Checklist. Developed by: The Catalogue of Life is led by Species 2000, working in partnership with the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS). Used data resources: The Catalogue of Life depends upon the contributions of more than 100 Global Species Databases, established at centers of expertise around the world. New data sources are continuously being identified to address gaps in the Catalogue. An overview of all contributing databases can be found at http://www.catalogueoflife.org/col/info/databases

  • This service aims to split scientific names into their basic components and is optimized to work with taxonomic rank equal or lower than species, following Darwin Core standards.

  • The Atlas of phytoplankton is a guide for the identification of marine and freshwater species. It includes pictures, synonyms, morphological, morphometric and ecological characteristics and geographical distribution of the taxa. It also provides formulas to calculate the biovolume and surface area based on linear dimensions according to the organism view (e.g., lateral, frontal, etc.).

  • A service that aims at verifying the species names (performing the taxonomy check) by using the input file SIA.csv. It represents the Step 1 of the Crustaceans Workflow within the Internal Joint Initiative.

  • WRIMS records which marine species in the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) have been introduced deliberately or accidentally by human activities to geographic areas outside their native range. It excludes species that colonized new locations naturally (so called 'range extensions'), even if in response to climate change. WRIMS notes the origin (source location) of the species at a particular location by country, sea area and/or latitude longitude as available. If the species is reported to have caused ecological or economic impacts it is considered invasive in that location. Each record is linked to a source publication or specialist database. A glossary of terminology is available. Species of particular concern because of being invasive have a peer-reviewed profile on the Global Invasive Species Database (GISD). In using WRIMS, users need to consider possible species misidentifications in the sources, and that for some species it is uncertain which are their native and introduced ranges. Whether a species is 'invasive' can vary between locations and over time at a particular location. The WRIMS data resulted from a data collection project within the framework of EMODnet Biology, and was established by the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ) in cooperation with the IUCN Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG). The WRIMS website is developed and hosted by VLIZ. WRIMS is part of the consolidated database Aphia, the database behind the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS).

  • This is a portal providing information at the species level: description, vernacular names, taxonomical rank, image galleries, literature, and DNA information. Currently, the Portal contains information for more than 151,000 species.

  • This step of the ARMS IJI workflow does the following: - Input: the output from the previous step (running a taxon check on the input species names using the WoRMS taxon checker); - Input: geographical locations for the sample(s) that those species were found at; - Check: using the WRIMS taxon match webservice to check the known distribution of the species; - Output: information about whether the species are alien or native to the location they were found at. It represents the Step 8 of the ARMS Workflow within the Internal Joint Initiative.